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70-200/2.8 VR Mk II Nikkor


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#1 mule_patterson

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 06:01 PM

Preliminary specs on the new generation model is a definite leap in the right direction - more ED glass elements and nanocoating on several elements for best-of-class color, contrast and sharpness. Forum visits have revealed to me that the vignetting and wide open performance are essentially resolved. Sample shots from Japan are typically exquisite, especially with little or no vignetting in good light. All else is still up to the reviews, Bjorn Rorslett is in the process of doing his.

Will I be retaining my Nikon middle class staus or parting with my first gen model to cop the better glass? Nope - I'd have to cough up at least 700 bucks to make the switch and don't feel the original is so inferior that I'll be any happier with the new kid on the block. But you'd sure would be in good shape to own one of these soon-to-be legendary short tele zooms. The best 70-200 glass is finally here...

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#2 Wheatsack

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 10:02 PM

Strangely Mule the difference in price in NZ dollars is also $700..... the list prices at Photo & Video in Christchurch http://www.photo.co....wnikon_lens.htm (Nikon AF-S 70-200mm VR ED f2.8 IF-ED $3,550.00 ) (Nikon AF-S 70-200mm VR II ED f2.8 IF-ED $4,250.00) and yep for sure the new version looks pretty good on paper... but I bet it would cost a bit more than the $700 to upgrade via tradein. Peter

Peter................................................ f8....and be there....


#3 hfrank

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 09:46 AM

I guess I've got pretty much the same dilemma concerning the NEW AND IMPROVED(?) VR system on Nikon's 300mm f2.8 prime. I do bird photography and my 70-200 just doesn't have the reach I need. I tried Nikon's f4 version. The reach was fine, but I often found myself needing to shoot at about 1/500 sec to overcome hand-shake, and that was simply too fast for the low-light conditions that prevail in Michigan, especially in woodlands. Now that the VRII has come out, I find that the older VR model has come down in price. KEH is selling in Excellent conditions for under $3,500. The new VRII goes for around $6,000. Is the upgraded VR system worth the extra money? Do you know of anyone who has tried both or any review that compares the two? Even if you haven't personally tried them, what are your thoughts based on what you might have read? Harry Frank Red River, NM Ann Arbor, MI

#4 Neil Rothschild

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 04:09 PM

Harry, I think you were looking at the AFS II lenses, at around $3500 to $3800. The one 300/2.8 VR they have listed is at $4500. I bought a 300/2.8 AFSII when the VR model came out, at a very good "close out" price. I just recently bought a 500/4 AFS (the original V2 model) for about what KEH is selling the 300/2.8 AFS II for. I don't need no stinkin' VR! (Actually, to be accuratre I can;t afford VR :D ) Thom Hogan just wrote an interesting article, where he argues that VR on the longer lenses is not all that useful and he tries to avoid using it in most cases. That made me feel good but I've seen quite a bit of controversy over that, mainly VR shooters disagreeing with him. I'm very happy just to get to 500/4 with AF :lol: I do most of my birding in wildlife refuges on barrier islands, shooting waterfowl. If I shot a lot in the woods I might feel differently about VR. It's a very controversial subject. I also shoot both those lenses strictly from a tripod. I would need VR, I think, to even try to shoot the 300/2.8 hand held, but that's my own limitation. I guess I could shoot it that way if I had to but it's just easier to use the 300/4 handheld when I need to do that. I usually have two camera bodies working when I bird, the 500/4 on a tripod and the 300/4, usually with a TC, by my side for overhead shots and other shots I can't get with the gimbal mounted lens.

#5 Neil Rothschild

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 04:16 PM

Mule, if I were you I wouldn't even think about upgrading since you are shooting DX. With my D700, I would like the II version of the 70-200. I actually use that lens with the D700 for landscape shots, wide open, at dusk, for astronomical type work. For that particular subject (and it's possible not everyone does that :lol:) I would seriously like to have the II model because the vignetting at the wide end is really bad. I may just use other lenses for that work, I guess, because like you said, the $700 is a steep price of admission. Other than that I don't have any serious complaints about the V1 model. The V2 model has it's own issues, in particular it does not focus nearly as close, more or less. Actually it suffers from serious focal length shrinkage at close focus distances, which can work for you or against you depending on how you look at it. Also, the V2 model dropped the AF lock buttons, right after I got sucked into a 24-70/2.8 that has those buttons (probably the first for a Nikon mid-range zoom). What is Nikon thinking? Are those buttons important or not? I guess I'll just keep using the AF lock button on my cameras if I ever upgrade. I don't use the lens AF lock buttons because not all my main lenses have/had them, but now that they do, I can re-train myself, given enough time. Then I'll end up upgrading the 70-200 and have to retrain myself again! What are they thinking??

#6 Guest_photogbuff_1970_*

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 01:02 AM

I don't use the lens AF lock buttons because not all my main lenses have/had them, but now that they do, I can re-train myself, given enough time. Then I'll end up upgrading the 70-200 and have to retrain myself again! What are they thinking??


I think, Neil, is that they were improving the VR function so that you could shoot a decently sharp picture (and some of those that I've seen at night are so crisp, you could cut your finger on the edges of the objects in the images) in dim light handheld.

BTW...I had the choice between going VRI and VRII on my new 70-200 and I figured, what the heck, I'll go 70-200 VR II. And it works great all things considered, even though I'm shooting DX right now. Certainly, I am looking at making an eventual upgrade to having a D700 (or replacement) as my primary body...But right now...heck...it works JUST fine on my DX... ~evil grin~

Posted ImagePosted Image I'm glad I bought this lens and I'm enjoying every minute of using it.




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