Jump to content


Photo

Blooming or leaching of the sensor on white objects


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 CaseyJM

CaseyJM

    Planet Citizen Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Chester Pa
  • Interests:Paramedic by trade, Photography by passion, Hunting, Fishing (Bass - bucket mouth or Bronze Backs) Target Shooting, World of Warcraft (my personal getaway), Firearms wood stock refinishing, Action movies

Posted 30 August 2017 - 05:43 PM

Does any one know how to stop the Blooming effect where the sensor leaches over the the next sensor causing a white halo to surround the white object.  I prefer to always shoot at a +3 or +7  or right shift to prevent as much digi noise as possible but I'm get to the point that i might try shooting -3 or -7 on objects that are white to prevent this blooming effects.  Any thoughts or help would be greatly appreciated. 

Jerome the Frustrated

 


_DSC8728-2_zpsxeu0azby.jpg

Nikon D7200, Tokina 11-16 F2.8 AT-X Pro, Sigma 17-50 F2.8 EX DC OS, Sigma 70-200 F2.8 APO EX DG OS, Tamron 150-600 F/5.6-6.3 Di VC G2, 
Nikon SB-600, Pro-Master GH-25 Gimbal, Pro-Master 528 Tripod[/font][/color]


#2 justshootit

justshootit

    Deep Space Hero Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4082 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cleveland, O
  • Interests:Event photography, candids, travelogues, aircraft photography.

Posted 30 August 2017 - 07:59 PM

You are getting this with a D7200??  This was common with old CCD-sensor cameras like the D70, but I didn't think it was much of an issue with CMOS-sensor cameras.


Don
==========================================================
Digital: D610 backed up by a D1x.  Quoted from an unknown source by a fellow planeteer, "Never get rid of a working D1x." I've got to agree.

Film: N90s, F3, F100, F4s, C330s. A few lenses.

Why film photography? I like shooting with the equipment. 6x6 Velvia slides from a C330 have an appeal all their own.

Why automated 35mm/Digital cameras? Event photography is about capturing moments. It often requires quick response. Well done automaton can be your friend or your enemy. It all depends on knowing what it can and can't do. "A man's got to know his (camera's) limitations." paraphrasing Dirty Harry...

#3 Dennis

Dennis

    Eon Timewave Master Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14354 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Interests:Photography, music, hiking (part of photography).

Posted 30 August 2017 - 08:06 PM

Sample?

Thanks, Dennis.

Photography: 100 percent art, 100 percent technical. It takes a photographer to blend them into an image.

​Film: That tangible image that you can see and hold.

My Web Site.
My 500px page.

My Instagram.
Member; Colorado Springs Creative Photography Group

Nikon D4, D200, Fm2, FM, Mamiya RB67.
 


#4 james23p

james23p

    Eon Timewave Master Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22582 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Memphis TN
  • Interests:I am an avid film user and digital user. I enjoy both formats and firmly believe they can live side by side.

    Right Jazz! :D

Posted 30 August 2017 - 09:01 PM

Sample?

Agree with Dennis post an example it would help us a lot to understand what you are getting, add in all your shooting datat and settings like color space etc. Plus Don is right that is not as common on CMOS sensors vs the older CCD sensors.

 

Jim


God bless all those in harms way and Go Navy!




D700 w/MB-D10, D605 w/MB-D14, D200 w/MB-D200, D50, Coolpix P330.

Nikon 1 stuff: Nikon V1, Nikkor 10mm f2.8 pancake w/HN-N101 & HC-N101, Nikkor 10-30mm f3.5-5.6 w/HB-N101 Aspherical VR,, Nikkor 18.5mm f1.8 w/HB-N104, Nikon 1 FT-1, SB-N5 w/Polaroid Diffuser .

F100 w MB-15, N80, FM3a, FE2(Black and Silver) and EM.

Nikkor 24-85G ED AF-S VR, 70-300G ED AF-S VR, 28-105 3.5-4.5 AF-D, 50 1.8 AF-D, Nikkor 18-35 f3.5-4.5 AF-D ED.

Nikon Series E lens, 28mm, 100mm, 135mm, 75-150mm, 70-210 f4.

MF Nikkor's 50 f2 Ai, 500 f4 ED Ai-P.

 

MF Rokinon 14mm f2.8 ED AE UMC(Ai-P)

MF Rokinon 85mm f1.4 ASP AE UMC(Ai-P)

Sigma 24-70 f2.8 EX DG HSM, Tamron's SP 70-200 f2.8 LD Di IF/Macro BIM, Kenko Pro 300 1.4 TC DGX, Tokina 100 f2.8D Macro At-X.

Pro Manfrotto 055XV with Markins M10 ,Sirui P-326 6-Section Carbon Fiber Monopod with Markins Q3 Emille, Manfrotto Compact MKC3-H01M with Combo Head, 3Pod PTT1H Table Top Tripod with Giottos MH1304 Ballhead.


#5 CaseyJM

CaseyJM

    Planet Citizen Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Chester Pa
  • Interests:Paramedic by trade, Photography by passion, Hunting, Fishing (Bass - bucket mouth or Bronze Backs) Target Shooting, World of Warcraft (my personal getaway), Firearms wood stock refinishing, Action movies

Posted 30 August 2017 - 09:14 PM

here are two examples,  the first one with the GWE standing alone was shot at -7 and the second was shot at +3,  look closely surrounding the egret there is a white halo appearance 

 

Attached Files


_DSC8728-2_zpsxeu0azby.jpg

Nikon D7200, Tokina 11-16 F2.8 AT-X Pro, Sigma 17-50 F2.8 EX DC OS, Sigma 70-200 F2.8 APO EX DG OS, Tamron 150-600 F/5.6-6.3 Di VC G2, 
Nikon SB-600, Pro-Master GH-25 Gimbal, Pro-Master 528 Tripod[/font][/color]


#6 ericbowles

ericbowles

    Planet Guardian Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 342 posts

Posted 31 August 2017 - 06:42 AM

Both of those images look a little over exposed.  Managing the white level in bright light can be a challenge because they are easy to blow out.  Small amounts can be recovered in post depending on the software.  Lightroom handles this pretty well but you may need to use the histogram.

 

Form a purist standpoint, blowing out the whites on a white bird subject is a fatal flaw, and it's a bad decision to try to expose to the right to the point where it is blown even a small amount.  In these images there are no shadows that you are looking to brighten - all you have is midtones, lights and whites that are overexposed.  Unless you have a wide dynamic range or important shadow detail, there is no real need to expose to the right.  You have 12 stops of dynamic range in the D7200, and the scene has about 8 stops of dynamic range.  Raising the ISO to achieve an Expose to the right strategy adds noise and reduces dynamic range of the file without accomplishing anything. 

 

Blooming or overspilling blown out areas is normal.  That's part of why it can be so hard to recover overexposed images.  The camera is working as designed.

 

Part of the problem is you are using an automated metering mode for this subject.  That makes it harder because the degree to which the white bird fills the frame varies.  The green background is slightly below a neutral gray tone, and the white great egret at least two stops above neutral.  So whatever exposure you pick is going to vary a lot depending on the size of the bird in the frame.  Center Weighted or Protect Highlights metering selections can get closer, but won't eliminate the problem.  You are using exposure compensation which can help, but it's going to change as the size of the subject in the frame changes.

 

For this kind of subject and situation, Manual exposure mode can be useful.  You can create a test image using Aperture or some other automated setting and simply lock in those settings.  Or you can spot meter the white bird and add two stops.  Either way works, and as long as your subject or subjects are in the same level of light, every exposure will be correct regardless of framing.


Eric Bowles

Bowles Images

www.bowlesimages.com

 

Join my Workshops and Tours - Workshops and Private Instruction 


#7 CaseyJM

CaseyJM

    Planet Citizen Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Chester Pa
  • Interests:Paramedic by trade, Photography by passion, Hunting, Fishing (Bass - bucket mouth or Bronze Backs) Target Shooting, World of Warcraft (my personal getaway), Firearms wood stock refinishing, Action movies

Posted 31 August 2017 - 06:52 AM

Both of those images look a little over exposed.  Managing the white level in bright light can be a challenge because they are easy to blow out.  Small amounts can be recovered in post depending on the software.  Lightroom handles this pretty well but you may need to use the histogram.

 

Form a purist standpoint, blowing out the whites on a white bird subject is a fatal flaw, and it's a bad decision to try to expose to the right to the point where it is blown even a small amount.  In these images there are no shadows that you are looking to brighten - all you have is midtones, lights and whites that are overexposed.  Unless you have a wide dynamic range or important shadow detail, there is no real need to expose to the right.  You have 12 stops of dynamic range in the D7200, and the scene has about 8 stops of dynamic range.  Raising the ISO to achieve an Expose to the right strategy adds noise and reduces dynamic range of the file without accomplishing anything. 

 

Blooming or overspilling blown out areas is normal.  That's part of why it can be so hard to recover overexposed images.  The camera is working as designed.

 

Part of the problem is you are using an automated metering mode for this subject.  That makes it harder because the degree to which the white bird fills the frame varies.  The green background is slightly below a neutral gray tone, and the white great egret at least two stops above neutral.  So whatever exposure you pick is going to vary a lot depending on the size of the bird in the frame.  Center Weighted or Protect Highlights metering selections can get closer, but won't eliminate the problem.  You are using exposure compensation which can help, but it's going to change as the size of the subject in the frame changes.

 

For this kind of subject and situation, Manual exposure mode can be useful.  You can create a test image using Aperture or some other automated setting and simply lock in those settings.  Or you can spot meter the white bird and add two stops.  Either way works, and as long as your subject or subjects are in the same level of light, every exposure will be correct regardless of framing.

Thank you very much Eric,  This will be a great help.  I very much appreciate you taken the time and responding.  I will be trying out this technique in the next couple of days.  Agin thanks 

Jerome


_DSC8728-2_zpsxeu0azby.jpg

Nikon D7200, Tokina 11-16 F2.8 AT-X Pro, Sigma 17-50 F2.8 EX DC OS, Sigma 70-200 F2.8 APO EX DG OS, Tamron 150-600 F/5.6-6.3 Di VC G2, 
Nikon SB-600, Pro-Master GH-25 Gimbal, Pro-Master 528 Tripod[/font][/color]





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users