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At a crossroads ????


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#1 Dennis

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 01:06 PM

so, for landscapes, I believe a landscape should be real (let's not talk about composites) and they should be pretty. So, I cleaned them up. Sometimes a small rock will hit the sunlight and make a white spot, same with snow. I also clean up portraits, again should be real, but should be pretty.

 

Now, this wildlife, I followed this guy in my viewfinder, hoping to capture him and the snow on his muzzle. I still getting over the flu, and I coughed and then he looked right at me. Picture set. Now, at home, I see the "dennis dreaded" white spots of snow in his main. To me, my eye, I should remove it. If there wasn't any snow on his muzzle, this would not even be a question for me. But, I thought I would ask in this case, as the white spots can be associated with the snow on his muzzle. What do you think? I know that they don't look to bad at this size, but a large print, those pesky little white spots will show up.

 

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Thanks, Dennis.

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#2 Art

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 05:27 PM

Dennis, for my taste:

 

1) The angle is from the wrong side of the light.  The Focal point is all in the shadow cast by his head.

2) background is too in focus and distracting.

 

Good image, nice animal. No editing on him necessary.  Looks fine.


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#3 Islander

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 11:15 PM

My goal with wildlife is similar to portraiture.  The subject should be isolated from the background either through DoF or a complimentary background.  As Art has stated this background is too busy .  One side of the antlers blends into that background while the other stands out against the snow beautifully.  The light direction is not ideal but with wildlife that sometimes is inevitable.

 

If I was to print this big I think I would remove those bright spots you refer to.


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#4 fotofill

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 10:42 PM

Light area always pull our eyes too them. That white snow on the rock is pretty intense. Ansel would name this... Elk By Snow Rock.

What else do you have?


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#5 Sailjunkie

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 12:53 PM

Hi Dennis,

 

I can't see the snow on his mane (at least on my 27" monitor), but I agree with Art's comment that the background is distracting.

 

I think I know what Art is talking about when he talks about angles.  However, I'm learning that with wildlife, you don't always have the time to pick the best angle.  :)


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#6 CaseyJM

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 08:49 PM

Hi Dennis,  I do agree with the DoF comments but have come to understand that with wildlife we rarely get to pick the perfect light, with the perfect angle of shooting, with the perfect DoF, all wrapped up with the perfect comp.  When walking with the camera we many times have to take what we get and be happy we got it.  The perfect shots are many set up with the photographer in a blind; set up were we have already scouted out the best time of day and then hoping the game/animal passes us.  I think you have a great shot and removing the spot of snow is entirely up to you, for me i don't find it too distracting, I might try to crop that in close to get just a head/shoulder shot with the antlers, it might solve some of the problems your having with the image.  

 

I am always amazed that I can take 500 images of wildlife and come back with none that i can use to make a great large print image from.  I have read several articles from several wildlife photographers and the one thing that they all say is that to get that one great image will takes thousands of not so great ones.  You just have to keep after them and keep on shooting.  

 

The one thing I am sure of is that you are highly skilled photographer and one day you will capture that one AWESOME, GREAT , and PERFECT image of an ELK in the perfect light, perfect angle, perfect background (DoF), and perfect expression.  I for one look forwarded to that photograph that for you meets all those requirements.  

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#7 Dennis

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 03:13 PM

Light area always pull our eyes too them. That white snow on the rock is pretty intense. Ansel would name this... Elk By Snow Rock.

What else do you have?

 

I do have another one, but the snow on the mussel fell of.

 

Attached File  _DSC7540-1.jpg   413.83KB   0 downloads


Thanks, Dennis.

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#8 CaseyJM

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 04:58 AM

very nice, I like it a lot


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#9 Dennis

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 12:41 PM

For the original, being critique, I gave a lens blur on the background and then cropped in tight. I think this is as best I can do with this image. I tried to give him posing direction, but he wasnt inclined to the idea.

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Thanks, Dennis.

Photography: 100 percent art, 100 percent technical. It takes a photographer to blend them into an image.

​Film: That tangible image that you can see and hold.

My Web Site.
My 500px page.

My Instagram.
Member; Colorado Springs Creative Photography Group, NPS member.

Nikon D4, D850, D200, Fm2, FM, Mamiya RB67.
 


#10 Sailjunkie

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 12:47 PM

Dennis, as you say, it's the best you can do.  I think it helps.  :)


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#11 justshootit

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 11:43 AM

Given that elk usually ignore model direction, stand close to backgrounds, and pose the way they feel like posing, I'd say these shots are superb!!!
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