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what my memory card could hold dropped significantly


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#1 Mickaisy

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 05:56 PM

first off, I just uploaded my second full card of pictures to my external drive and noticed a big change with the pictures on my 4GB card. My first time shooting I shot with JPEG fine and my 4GB card let me take exactly 704 pics which were successfully saved to my external drive. I uploaded my second round that had a good mix of JPEG, JPEG and RAW, and then just RAW. I got 470 pics out of that until the card was full. When i noticed that the first JPEG fine card saved 700, I deleted the pictures off the card and noticed that with just RAW i get under 300 and when I go to just JPEG fine setting i only get 534 pics instead of the 700. Why did the JPEG fine drop from 700 pics to a little over 500 pics available? I even reformatted the card after i deleted it but this did not change the numbers. I am just wondering why this happened and what, if any, factors contribute to the amount of pictures on a memory card? This question is more concerning the JPEG fine issue which i don't shoot at no longer, but curious why the amount dropped significantly. Any info regarding this would be great to know. Thank you:) Hope this question is clear.

Edited by Mickaisy, 14 February 2010 - 05:59 PM.

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#2 justshootit

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 06:28 PM

If the card is a Lexar card, download their ImageRescue software and run a verify on the card to see if it has any failed sectors. If so, replace it. This software also has a facility for low-level formatting and completely erasing a card. If the sector test checks out ok, reformat the card with ImageRescue and see if the problem clears up. The ohher card manufacturers likely have similar tools.

Edited by justshootit, 14 February 2010 - 06:31 PM.

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#3 Mickaisy

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 08:46 PM

If the card is a Lexar card, download their ImageRescue software and run a verify on the card to see if it has any failed sectors. If so, replace it. This software also has a facility for low-level formatting and completely erasing a card. If the sector test checks out ok, reformat the card with ImageRescue and see if the problem clears up.

The ohher card manufacturers likely have similar tools.


Does every little thing have to be so darn complicated? Thanks for the information. I have a sand disk sdhd card. i will heck their website i suppose to see how to go about fixing this. Not too much has gone right for me yet:( Very frustrating.
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#4 Gary Poole

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 09:55 PM

I don't think anything is wrong with your card. Nikon cameras all underestimate the remaining capacity of the memory cards. JPG files and compressed NEF files can vary in size depending on the image. Nikon does their remaining frames computation based on the worst case file sizes. Using compressed NEF I typically get about 1.5 times the original remaining frames of my cards. Similar underestimates undoubtedly will happen when you are saving JPGs.
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#5 justshootit

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 10:26 PM

Honestly, I've adapted to digital ok, but I don't get the same satisfaction from using the gear that I got from using my film gear. Somehow I enjoy film more. I know it's nowhere near as good at high ISO, but I still like my film gear better than my digital stuff. Too many techno-weenie computerized details in the latter, maybe...
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Digital: D610 backed up by a D1x.  Quoted from an unknown source by a fellow planeteer, "Never get rid of a working D1x." I've got to agree.

Film: N90s, F3, F100, F4s, C330s. A few lenses.

Why film photography? I like shooting with the equipment. 6x6 Velvia slides from a C330 have an appeal all their own.

Why automated 35mm/Digital cameras? Event photography is about capturing moments. It often requires quick response. Well done automaton can be your friend or your enemy. It all depends on knowing what it can and can't do. "A man's got to know his (camera's) limitations." paraphrasing Dirty Harry...

#6 Dave Whiteley

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 06:50 AM

I had the same trouble in the past occasionally using Elements to clear the card that was solved using the camera to format the card instead.

I am not a computer bod like many on this Forum, they can tell you better than me how they work. But as I understand it memory cards work the same same as computer hard disks. A proper delete overwriting the disk or card with "0's" or "1's" would take ages, so instead a normal delete just alters the File Allocation Table (FAT file) the card or drives "index" which is first quizzed to show what is on the disk or memory card. If you remove the location of images or data from the FAT file the camera or computer then thinks it is empty and just overwrites any data still on the card or drive. Think of it like the old days of tape or video recorders. There are two ways of removing images on the tape. You can either delete everything by running the tape all the way through on delete, which takes time, or you can simply record over the top of existing images, which is quicker.

With deletes for memory cards or computers you simply do the quick delete that simply tells the FAT File the card or drive is empty and so the camera, or computer then just records new data or images over the top of your last lot of data or images, which are still there. If the FAT file is is not completely cleared by the delete it will show some images still remaining, therefore the number of spaces left will reflect this and the card will not overwrite those so you will not get so many new ones on the card. Delete may not remove everything on occasion, but formatting should remove all images. A quote from the Web:-

"When you delete pictures (or any files) from a memory card (or PC) the data itself isn’t deleted, just the file system pointers that says where the data for those files is located. The area where the deleted picture data was stored is also now marked as free space so it is available to the system for any new files to be written there instead."

That is how data recovery services and police forensics work, since people often think they have deleted a file, but if it has not been already overwritten, or not too many times, it can often still be read using special recovery software. Security software simply overwrites any file you delete many times using either "O's" or "1's" so it cannot be read by such software.

Try this first (see your manual for how to format using the camera as it is a two button job with Nikon's):-

http://www.digicamhe...-a-memory-card/

If that does not work and you have a card reader (don't try it with the card in camera) you can try formatting it this way to see if it will clear it and restore it's original capacity:-

http://www.ehow.com/...emory-card.html

After formatting using the computer you may need to format it again using the camera formatting function so it is restored to the cameras formatting requirements.

If those fail, as others have said above, you can download a trial card recovery utility off the web to both recover any images left on the card and also then erase everything when the card should once again hold the full number of JPEG's or RAW files. However, as pointed out previously by others, JPEG and RAW file sizes differ so your card will show it can hold more JPEG's than RAW, and if you mix JPEG and RAW obviously you will get a different number still.

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#7 Sailjunkie

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 01:59 PM

Hi Mick, I think that Dave and Gary have offered some excellent comments and advice. I notice that Gary's observation holds true every time that I use my camera. I would also take care not to completely fill your memory card when you use it. Last year, the Olympics photo manager was a guest speaker at our photo club. Nick said that when you completely fill your memory card, you increase the likelihood of corrupting your card. Mark
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#8 Mickaisy

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 08:48 PM

Hi Mick,

I think that Dave and Gary have offered some excellent comments and advice. I notice that Gary's observation holds true every time that I use my camera.

I would also take care not to completely fill your memory card when you use it. Last year, the Olympics photo manager was a guest speaker at our photo club. Nick said that when you completely fill your memory card, you increase the likelihood of corrupting your card.

Mark


Excellent advice mark, i will never forget that. i will do my best at always leaving like 30 pics available and transferring the actual pictures off the card quickly.


I just used the the nikon menu to delete the card and to format it as well. It only took like a second to format it. My card is brand new so I am going to lean towards what Gary said cause that seems to make sense, and was kind of what i was thinking. I will look into those links Dave. Thanks for the info everyone.
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#9 JLC

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 04:45 PM

Am not a well versed camera or computer person, but RAW does use more space, and doing JPEG, JPEG FINE and RAW you would not get as many shots. Also someone else mentioned depends on the type of shot, have seen this in my shooting also. As to the comment about not filling your card, we have been suing the same cards for over a year, we fill them all the time, even have a couple that went thri=u the washing machine, and we have never had any trouble with them. Just my .01cents
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#10 Dave Whiteley

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 05:58 AM

Back to the drawing board then Jean. It's obviously no use me using the washing machine anymore to try and clean images from the memory card. :blink: Dave Whiteley :)
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#11 Jes

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 07:41 PM

Hi I always delete the contents of the card in the camera, not the computer and also every 3rd or 4th time reformat the card. It's not a long job but worth doing. I saw an article in a magazine quite some time ago (we had a Fuji Finepix 1300 and a Richo at the time) and it said never delete the photos on your card with your computer do it with the camera. It was to do with the way windows deletes files.

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