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#1 gophillies74

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 03:56 PM

Recently took photos for a client with 12mp D700.
Client comes back and says he tried to print images but they look pixelated. Client says he's trying to print upwards of 24x36 and also says he is using a professional printing service that specializes in commercial work. Question is, shouldn't the printer know how to remedy this or is it all my responsibility to provide enlargements for bigger printing sizes? Note: we merely agreed on price per image. I stated I would supply full size full resolution files.

#2 james23p

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 05:53 PM

The images he wants 24x36 were they cropped? Plus sometimes if they are over sharpened this will happen.

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#3 gophillies74

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 07:46 PM

Maybe cropped. No sharpening. Just kinda figured the printer that advertises specialty in posters and large prints would take it upon themselves to correct it. I'm gonna use an enlarging plugin and see where that gets me as well as bumping up dpi to 330.

#4 Dennis

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 07:50 PM

Yeah, you need to have a file that is 36x24 or 10800x7200px (300 DPI) to print correctly at a lab. You have to have at least the pix to cover the size at 240 ~300 DPI for full res, it depends on the lab. At 240 DPI the px for 36x24 is 8640x5760.


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#5 gophillies74

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 09:00 PM

Just checked. The ppi was at 300. Just used Perfect Resize to bump em up to 24x36 with 300ppi....find out tomorrow if it worked. They said they were pixelated which I'm sure they were but some of the pics were pushed to the limits of processing with clarity and such.



#6 gophillies74

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 09:01 PM

for example

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#7 Mr Gladstone

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 02:39 AM

Great image by the way
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#8 ericbowles

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 07:35 AM

Today, I think you need to specify output size of files in advance.  I'm using a D800E, and I typically provide clients with images that are 4000 pixels on the long side unless specified otherwise.  For web use it is smaller - 1200 pixels on the long side.  For a 24x36 output they need to be specifying higher resolution on the long side  240-360 ppi depending on the printer and use - and you can build that into your quote and workflow.  Significantly upsizing an image can have a big impact on edited images - and might mean you need to completely re-edit an image with some added steps. 

 

It's also easy for a client to "view at 100%".  I need to make sure they understand that 100% means different things at different image sizes.

 

I don't know that it is clear who owns sizing.  The printer can provide specifications on the front end and you can build that into the project.  The client needs to understand why it matters - or just pay for the added production time.

 

Don't forget to educate them on small images as well.  It's just as bad having a large file and downsizing it for the web without additional sharpening for output size.  I typically provide clients with web sized files in addition to larger files so they can be used on the web or emailed easily.  My clients seem to need small files more than large ones.


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#9 Black Pearl

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Posted 31 October 2014 - 05:22 PM

First off you don't need 300ppi for printing in a lab - that is for off-set printing in the likes of a magazine.

 

Secondly all the labs I have used - by that I mean I have actually ran the machines on a commercial basis - haven't needed files to be re-sized prior to them being input.

 

The software that comes with the labs/printers is designed to deal with images and resize them to get the best results for that particle machine. I have put a cropped file from the D300s (12mp) into the lab at Jessops and asked for an A0 enlargement and it was fantastic. Not razor sharp at close viewing but certainly good enough for hanging on a wall and looking at and in no way was it pixelated. You can play about if you like but I would suggest to your client that they go to a printers that know what they are doing.


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#10 ericbowles

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 09:50 AM

There is a lot of variation among photo printers and print labs.  While printers and printer software can resize images automatically, the expert recommendations are to get as close as possible to native resolution of the actual printer being used.   Most commercial photo printers are using high volume printers geared to fast output rather than highest quality.  To the extent there are image specific issues, it's a lot better to manage those issues before going to the printer and their software.

 

Offset printing is a completely different animal with different resolution requirements.  But the same idea may still be relevant.   But the original post was talking about photo printing here.

 

The Epson printers have a native resolution of 360 ppi, so either you size it for the printer, or the printer will manage resizing.  I don't think you can say that a lab does not need 300 ppi unless you have more information on what printer they are using.  

 

I just worked with a commercial printer for a magazine cover using a crop of a D800E image.  That's a 36 MP to start.  I had to upsize the image nearly 50% for the printer to their planned output size and crop since the image was to be cropped and would wrap around front and back covers.  If I had simply turned the basic image over to them, there might have been some artifacts or pixelation.

 

For a 24x36 inch print, there are lots of options - from low end high volume printing to high quality fine art printers.  The base file does have the capability of being produced at the desired size, but I don't think you can disregard file size.  Here is a link to the specifications at BayPhoto.com:  http://www.bayphoto....preparation.htm


Edited by ericbowles, 02 November 2014 - 10:00 AM.

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